6-8th Grade GT English Language Arts

Ms. Gray

 

Instructional Goals

During our school year, we will explore our language through reading and writing about both literary and informational text. At the end of this course, you will be able to read, understand, explain, and analyze increasingly complex texts; and further develop skills & understandings mastered in preceding grades.**

**from Louisiana Student Standards for ELA

 

Required Materials:

To successfully complete this course, you will need to bring the following items to class daily.

  • current unit of study materials, such as novel and printed resources
  • binder (2 tabs for ELA: “handouts” & “vocabulary”) and composition notebook
  • pens, pencils, & highlighters
  • notebook paper
  • school planner or personal assignment book
  • a positive attitude and willingness to learn

 

Resources

 

Course Schedule by Grading Periods and Grade Levels

6th Grade Coursework

1st Unit: Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read literary and informational texts to understand how positive thinking, slowing down to think clearly, problem solving, and constant vigilance support survival in the face of grave danger and overwhelming odds. Students express their understanding of characters in literature by analyzing the struggle of man versus nature and the life lessons we can learn from others’ survival situations.

2nd Unit: The Witch of Blackbird Pond, by Elizabeth George Speare; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read to understand the influence of family expectations and religious values on the development of one’s personal identity. Students express their understanding of how informational texts in coordination with literary texts enhance their comprehension of time periods and the theme and setting of the novel.

3rd Unit: Out of the Dust, by Karen Hesse; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read to understand how people respond to adversity, the lessons that can be learned from hardship and failure, and what happens when we take good fortune for granted. Students express their understanding of the social and environmental issues farmers faced in the 1930s, noting how reading literary and informational texts enhances their understanding of the topic.

4th Unit: Steve Jobs; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read about the role of failure in success. Students understand that success takes hard work, deliberate practice, and the ability to learn from failures and persevere. They express their understanding by exploring how an author’s word choice, use of evidence, and selected organization reflect a text’s purpose and then by writing their own personal narrative based on the models.

 

7th Grade Coursework

1st Unit: The Giver, by Lois Lowry (as well as several companion novels that will be student choice from a list)

Students read dystopian literature and related informational texts to understand how individual perspectives are shaped by knowledge and memory and to determine whether perfection is worth the sacrifice. Students express their understanding by analyzing how a theme is developed through characters and their contrasting points of view and also comparing and contrasting the themes of similar texts.

2nd Unit: Written in Bone, Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland, by Sally M. Walker (as well as several companion novels that will be student choice from a list)

Students read literary and informational texts about the stories of our past to understand how different texts offer unique historical perspectives and how authors sometimes alter details of history to serve a purpose. Students express their understanding by corroborating details of the past, deciphering an author’s purpose, and writing their own fictionalized version of a historical account.

3rd Unit: Behind the Scenes, or 30 Years a Slave and 4 Years in the White House, by Elizabeth Keckley (as well as several companion novels that will be student choice from a list)

Students read literary and informational texts about the Civil War, a tumultuous period in our country’s history. Students understand that by examining different perspectives through various accounts, real and fictional, they can gain a deeper understanding of the time period and express their understanding through identifying and then comparing and contrasting different accounts of people, events, and ideas of the time.

4th Unit: “Memoir”—details available online at louisianabelieves.com. (additional companion novels that will be student choice from a list)

8th Grade Coursework

1st Unit: “Flowers for Algernon” short story by Daniel Keys; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read literary and informational texts about knowledge and intelligence to understand what happens when humans try to manipulate the minds of others and how our understanding of intelligence has evolved over time. Students express their understanding of these ideas by exploring how authors draw on traditional stories and develop characters and themes to teach us about ourselves and others.

2nd Unit: “The Tell Tale Heart” short story by Edgar Allen Poe; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read literary and informational texts to understand the role of the narrator and point of view. Students also understand how the narrative voice of a text can blur the line between fact and fiction. Students express their understanding through writing in different points of view and examining motives and bias in various media.

3rd Unit: The Call of the Wild, by Jack London; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read texts about human interaction with animals and nature. They understand how authors portray animals to serve a purpose and make a comment about human interaction with animals. Students then explore scientific and personal accounts of animal cognition to express their understanding of Jack London’s portrayal of Buck and his interaction with humans in The Call of the Wild.

4th Unit: Night, by Elie Wiesel; additional student-chosen companion texts

Students read texts focusing on the tolls of war on society – individuals and nations – and explore the potential of conflict to rob innocence while forging identity. Students will explore the human attempt to make sense of the tragedies of war by means of connecting to others, often through art. This unit can connect to Social Studies. The literary focus for this unit will be analysis of a drama.

Each unit is subject to change and modification, as necessary.

  • Tests and quizzes will be announced and posted in class and online.
  • Benchmark and progress achievement tests will not be announced and will be on-going throughout the year, culminating in the LEAP in April & May.

 

Policies and Procedures

General Rules:

Spartans are…

  • Prompt – This means you enter the classroom quietly, on time, seated, and ready to learn.
  • Prepared – Have your materials ready, complete all assignments, and study for tests.
  • Polite – Always, always treat others with respect and kindness.

 

Grading Policies:

You will receive your grades from a variety of different sources:

class assignments              projects         quizzes

homework assignments    tests               daily bell ringer activity

 

Make-up & Late Work:

  • In accordance to CPSB policy, if you have an excused absence, you will receive three days to make-up your assignment(s) (homework, tests, quizzes, etc.) for full credit.
  • It is your responsibility to get the make-up work for the day(s) that you missed and turn it in.
  • Late work due to unexcused absences or student apathy will be accepted for partial credit of the original grade. The partial credit will be based upon type of assignment, point value, and date of submission.

 

Contact Information:

If you have any concerns throughout the year, please to contact me, via our remind.com text messages, e-mail at segray@caddoschools.org, or through the school office at 868-5324. You will receive notice at least 2 weeks prior to IEP meetings. To schedule a conference, please contact our 6th grade counselor, Ms. Duke, at 364-3092.

 

“If people cannot write well, they cannot think well,

and if they cannot think well, others will do their thinking for them.”

–George Orwell